Kidney Disease Risk Quiz

Are you at risk for kidney disease?
Find out in less than 60 seconds.

One in ten adults living in the U.S. has kidney disease and most don't know it, because there are often no symptoms. Not knowing if you are at risk could mean risky business to your health.

Get kidney aware by taking this short quiz – there's no studying required and by the end of it, you'll be head of the class.

  • Step 1 of 13
    This will take only a couple of minutes…

    Are you over the age of 55?

    Yes

    No

    Kidney Smart Tip

    People over the age of 55 should get screened for kidney disease during their annual doctor's visit.

  • Step 2 of 13
    …and it could be the simplest quiz you ever take!

    Do you have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes?

    Yes

    No

    Kidney Smart Tip

    Diabetes is the number one cause of chronic kidney disease.

  • Step 3 of 13
    No pressure here – this quiz is a breeze, right?

    Do you have or are you currently being treated for high blood pressure (hypertension)?

    Yes

    No

    Kidney Smart Tip

    High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, is a leading cause of chronic kidney disease.

  • Step 4 of 13
    Don't you just love "Yes" or "No" questions?

    Are you overweight or obese?

    (Don't know? Find out here.)

    Yes

    No

    Kidney Smart Tip

    It's important to maintain a healthy weight by eating right and exercising.

  • Step 5 of 13
    Nice work so far!

    Are you African American, Native American, Latino or Asian American?

    Yes

    No

    Kidney Smart Tip

    Some ethnic groups in the United States are at greater risk for diabetes and high blood pressure than others.

  • Step 6 of 13
    We told you it wouldn't take long!

    Do you have a family history of kidney disease?

    Yes

    No

    Kidney Smart Tip

    Chronic kidney disease can run in the family, so encourage your loved ones to get tested during their routine medical exam, too.

  • Step 7 of 13
    You're half-way there!

    Have you been diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (heart disease)?

    Yes

    No

    Kidney Smart Tip

    Cardiovascular disease is common in people with kidney disease regardless of age, stage of kidney disease or if they've had a transplant.

  • Step 8 of 13
    You're almost two-thirds done!

    Have you been diagnosed with HIV/AIDS, lupus or hepatitis C?

    Yes

    No

    Kidney Smart Tip

    People with HIV/AIDS, lupus or hepatitis C are prone to getting kidney-related diseases.

  • Step 9 of 13
    We're impressed—you're almost finished!

    Do you regularly take over-the-counter pain medications (NSAIDS), such as ibuprofen or naproxen, or do you have a history of taking lithium?

    Yes

    No

    Kidney Smart Tip

    Taking too many over-the-counter pain medications can be harmful to people with kidney problems.

  • Step 10 of 13
    You've got this!

    Have you ever been told by a healthcare provider that you have protein in your urine?

    Yes

    No

    Kidney Smart Tip

    Protein in the urine, also called proteinuria, is a sign there may be some damage to the kidneys.

  • Step 11 of 13
    You're almost to the finish line.

    Do you currently smoke or have you smoked in the past for more than 10 years?

    Yes

    No

    Kidney Smart Tip

    Smoking can cause an increase in blood pressure, reduce blood flow to the kidneys and accelerate loss of kidney function.

  • Step 12 of 13
    Last step before you see your results!

    Have you ever been diagnosed with kidney disease or experienced acute kidney failure?

    Yes

    No

    Kidney Smart Tip

    If you have kidney disease, consult your healthcare team about slowing its progression through prescribed medications, a kidney-friendly diet, exercise and a healthy lifestyle.

Step 13 of 13
Check out your results. There's one more step before you go…
0

Risk Factors

Your Results

You have 0 risk factors. Your answers indicate that you don't currently have any of the risk factors included in this quiz. That's good news! However, not all the risk factors that can lead to kidney disease are covered here. Keep in mind that 20 million people living in the U.S. – one in ten adults – have kidney disease and many don't know it because kidney disease has few recognizable symptoms. Be sure to schedule annual physical exams with your doctor and discuss appropriate health screenings. If you are interested in helping others affected by kidney disease, find out how to become an organ donor.

You have 1 risk factors. To learn more about each risk factor and what your next steps should be, rollover each factor below. And now that you're becoming kidney smart, find out how to schedule a kidney screening.

Risk Factors

Over 55 yes Learn More

People over the age of 55 are more susceptible to kidney disease. Schedule a physical exam with your doctor every year (and make sure you go!). Ask your doctor to order a kidney disease test (a simple blood test is all that is required) in addition to the other recommended health-related screenings.

Diabetes yes Learn More

Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney disease. Many people don't know they have diabetes and many more that have been diagnosed may not be following their recommended treatment plan. Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to kidney disease. Early detection, education, keeping blood sugar levels under control, eating healthy, exercising, taking medications as prescribed, and seeing your doctor on a regular basis are very important. If you have diabetes, make sure you are getting tested for kidney disease every year.

High Blood Pressure yes Learn More

Hypertension is the second leading cause of kidney disease. Many people don't know they have hypertension and many more that have been diagnosed may not be following their recommended treatment plan. Uncontrolled hypertension can lead to kidney disease. Early detection, education, keeping high blood pressure under control, eating healthy, exercising, taking medications as prescribed, and seeing your doctor on a regular basis are very important. If you have hypertension, make sure you are getting tested periodically, as recommended by your physician.

Overweight yes Learn More

Being overweight or obese can be harmful to your health. It is also a leading cause of diabetes, which is the number one cause of kidney failure. Along with helping your heart health, losing weight can increase energy levels, help control blood sugar if you have diabetes, maintain good blood pressure and decrease cholesterol levels. Schedule a physical exam with your doctor every year (and make sure you go!). Talk to your doctor about getting tested for diabetes and high blood pressure in addition to other recommended health screenings.

Ethnicity yes Learn More

Some ethnic groups in the United States are at greater risks for developing diabetes, high blood pressure and kidney disease. Visit your doctor or clinic regularly to check blood sugar, blood pressure, protein in your urine and kidney function. Work with your doctor on how you can prevent or control your diabetes, high blood pressure or kidney disease.

Family History yes Learn More

People with a family history of kidney disease have a high risk of getting it. Be aware of your risks and get regular kidney screenings, control your diabetes or high blood pressure, exercise, eat healthy and take medications as prescribed by your doctor.

Heart Disease yes Learn More

Cardiovascular disease is common in people with kidney disease. A heart disease diagnosis should prompt you to get tested regularly for kidney disease and adopt a more heart-healthy lifestyle. It usually starts in the kitchen.

HIV/AIDS, Lupus or Hepatitis C yes Learn More

HIV/AIDS, lupus or hepatitis C can negatively impact kidney function. If you have one of these conditions or believe you are at risk, talk to your doctor about getting screened regularly for kidney disease and work closely with your doctor on a treatment plan.

Over-the-Counter Painkiller Use yes Learn More

Some medications such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including ibuprofen and naproxen, are not usually recommended for people with kidney disease unless prescribed by their kidney doctor. It is recommended that you talk to your doctor before taking any medicine when you are at risk for kidney disease.

Protein in Urine yes Learn More

Protein in the urine (proteinuria) can be a sign of decreased kidney function. Medical care focuses on treating the underlying condition, such as normalizing blood pressure or controlling blood sugar levels for those with diabetes. Talk to your doctor about results of your tests to better understand what they mean for you.

Smoker yes Learn More

Smoking can harm your kidneys, including increasing blood pressure, reducing blood flow to the kidneys and accelerating loss of kidney function. If you haven't done so yet, talk to your doctor about how to quit.

Kidney Disease yes Learn More

If you have been diagnosed with chronic kidney disease, there are ways to slow its progression. Your doctor may have you on medication to help control your condition. Your dietitian may have also placed you on a special diet that restricts sodium (salt), protein, phosphorus and potassium.

*There are different levels of risk factors, so each individual's experience can vary. The above table of kidney disease risk factors is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for medical advice or diagnosis from a physician. If you have concerns about your health or the risk factors for kidney disease, please consult with your physician.

Make the Pledge for Kidney Health

20 million people living in the U.S. have kidney disease and most don't know it because there are very few visible symptoms. Do something good for your kidneys and make the pledge today to get screened in 2014!

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Congratulations!

You have taken an important step in ensuring your kidney health. Be sure to talk to your doctor about a kidney screening on your next visit.

Here's to being kidney smart!

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